sheltered from tomorrow



1bohemian:

Isamu Noguchi, 1935 -by Edward Weston 

1bohemian:

Isamu Noguchi, 1935 -by Edward Weston 

(Source: thenoguchimuseum)

(Source: perfectlyaskew)

awkwardnarturtle:

i-mahu:

There’s two types of anger one is dry and the other wet and basically wet anger is when your eyes water and your voice shakes and I hate that cause I feel weak when I’m crying while angry I like dry anger when your face is like stone and your voice is sharp I guess wet anger shows that you care too much and dry anger means you’re done.

This is the best description ever

naprasno:

9heartofgold6:

Jhonn Balance xx

business in the front, party in the back

naprasno:

9heartofgold6:

Jhonn Balance xx

business in the front, party in the back


Swan lying dead in the snow

Swan lying dead in the snow

(Source: malformalady)

funnymalemodels:

….Florian…at JG…his eyes…*dead*..

funnymalemodels:

….Florian…at JG…his eyes…*dead*..

sonofaodh:

COMME des GARÇONS HOMME PLUS 1985 SS first collection

sonofaodh:

COMME des GARÇONS HOMME PLUS 1985 SS first collection

cnyck:

krisvanschiele:

raf-goals:

garff:

michaelvel:

toephix:

cotonblanc:

Dries Van Noten (1986)
trickymintty:

Just like the way he looks through the camera…judgmental.ph by Virginia Arcaro

trickymintty:

Just like the way he looks through the camera…judgmental.
ph by Virginia Arcaro

(Source: marcusblack1844)

nickdrake:

Robert Smith circa 1983.

nickdrake:

Robert Smith circa 1983.


Chris Beek photographed by Willy Vanderperre for Vogue Hommes International F/W 2013

Chris Beek photographed by Willy Vanderperre for Vogue Hommes International F/W 2013

(Source: vogueanon)

luzfosca:

Andreas Feininger
A view from New Jersey of the moon shining over Manhattan’s RCA and Chrysler buildings as its light shimmers on the waters of the Hudson River in September 1946.
From Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images
mayakovsky:


The “fight for futurism” was a deliberately outrageous campaign against contemporary art and literature initiated in Moscow and carried on in the provincial cities of Russia. To advertise their first appearance on October 13, 1913, the futurist comrades, Burliuk, Mayakovsky, Kamensky, and Livshits, gathered at a busy point in Moscow and at exactly noon set off down the street with a slow and solemn step, each in turn reciting his latest, most shocking “futurist” poems. Their mien as they moved was stern and serious and they didn’t smile at all, though Mayakovsky was wearing an orange blouse (supposedly made for him by his mother and sisters), Burliuk was in a top hat and frock coat and had a dog with rampant tail painted on his cheek, Livshits wore an extravagant tie and handkerchief, Kamensky, who was an aviator, had an airplane painted on his face, and they all wore wooden spoons, instead of green carnations, in their buttonholes. Kamensky in his book describes the wild consternation of the crowds that gathered to observe this literary phenomenon. Amusement turned into outrage and even fear. Members of the crowd threatened to beat the poets. Someone called the police, who tried to break it up. A young girl offered Mayakovsky an orange, which he proceeded to eat. “He’s eating! He’s eating!” the whisper went up and down the street.

—Edward J. Brown, Mayakovsky: A Poet in the Revolution

mayakovsky:

The “fight for futurism” was a deliberately outrageous campaign against contemporary art and literature initiated in Moscow and carried on in the provincial cities of Russia. To advertise their first appearance on October 13, 1913, the futurist comrades, Burliuk, Mayakovsky, Kamensky, and Livshits, gathered at a busy point in Moscow and at exactly noon set off down the street with a slow and solemn step, each in turn reciting his latest, most shocking “futurist” poems. Their mien as they moved was stern and serious and they didn’t smile at all, though Mayakovsky was wearing an orange blouse (supposedly made for him by his mother and sisters), Burliuk was in a top hat and frock coat and had a dog with rampant tail painted on his cheek, Livshits wore an extravagant tie and handkerchief, Kamensky, who was an aviator, had an airplane painted on his face, and they all wore wooden spoons, instead of green carnations, in their buttonholes. Kamensky in his book describes the wild consternation of the crowds that gathered to observe this literary phenomenon. Amusement turned into outrage and even fear. Members of the crowd threatened to beat the poets. Someone called the police, who tried to break it up. A young girl offered Mayakovsky an orange, which he proceeded to eat. “He’s eating! He’s eating!” the whisper went up and down the street.

—Edward J. Brown, Mayakovsky: A Poet in the Revolution

"Гостья из будущего"

"Гостья из будущего"